What Is It Like Going Blind And Deaf?

Steven McCoy is sitting in a chair with his legs crossed wearing a 3 piece blue suit
Rebecca Alexander is sitting in a chair wearing a black dress with her legs crossed

Please join us for an educational and awareness evening to learn about the rare disease Usher syndrome. CART will be available at the event. For other accessible requests see below.

 

a graphic of a timeline-5-6 pm drinks and appetizers, 6-6:15 private film premier, 6:15-7:15 discussion with Q&A, 7:15-7:45 Meet and Greet, 8:00 End of event.

Please Note: If you need an SSP ask your MCB case manager to fill out the referral form and send that to Jonathan Lejeune at jlejeune@deafinconline.org. DBCAN will process the request to provide SSP or CN services. Needs to be coordinated two weeks in advance of the event.

Rebecca Alexander

Rebecca Alexander

Rebecca Alexander is an author, psychotherapist, disability rights advocate, group fitness instructor, and extreme athlete who is almost completely blind and deaf. Rebecca was born with a rare genetic disorder called Usher syndrome and has been simultaneously losing both her sight and hearing since she was a child. She was told that she would likely be completely blind and deaf by the age of 30.

Now, at 42, with only a sliver of sight and total deafness, without the use of her cochlear implants, Rebecca has a thriving psychotherapy practice with two masters’ degrees from Columbia University. In addition to narrating the PBS American Master’s biopic documentary “Becoming Helen Keller” (Oct 2021), Rebecca has been featured on many TV shows and in numerous publications, has been honored with prestigious awards for her advocacy work, presented for TEDx, and has been the keynote speaker for many esteemed companies and organizations. Among her many extraordinary feats, Rebecca participated in the 600-mile AIDS Lifecycle ride, summited Mt. Kilimanjaro, swam from Alcatraz to shore in the San Francisco Bay, and competed in the Civilian Military Combine (CMC) races. Rebecca’s critically acclaimed award-winning memoir, “Not Fade Away: A Memoir of Senses Lost and Found” is currently in development to be made into a major motion picture.